Employment of Computer and Information Research Scientists by state

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes National Industry-Specific Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates.

The BLS estimated 24,580 persons were employed as “Computer and Information Research Scientists” in 41 states. The employment occupation code is 15-1111.

52 percent of all jobs were in 5 states: California, Virginia, Maryland, Texas and Massachusetts.

State Employment Percent
California 4,440 18.1%
Virginia 3,360 13.7%
Maryland 2,100 8.5%
Texas 1,660 6.8%
Massachusetts 1,480 6.0%
New Jersey 1,010 4.1%
Washington 960 3.9%
Pennsylvania 950 3.9%
New York 840 3.4%
Illinois 790 3.2%
Florida 730 3.0%
Ohio 720 2.9%
Georgia 670 2.7%
Alabama 560 2.3%
Colorado 360 1.5%
Rhode Island 360 1.5%
North Carolina 290 1.2%
Arizona 280 1.1%
District of Columbia 280 1.1%
Mississippi 270 1.1%
Utah 270 1.1%
Connecticut 240 1.0%
Tennessee 220 0.9%
South Carolina 210 0.9%
New Mexico 190 0.8%
Michigan 170 0.7%
Minnesota 170 0.7%
Oklahoma 150 0.6%
Missouri 100 0.4%
Wisconsin 100 0.4%
Idaho 90 0.4%
Delaware 80 0.3%
Hawaii 80 0.3%
Kansas 70 0.3%
Arkansas 60 0.2%
New Hampshire 60 0.2%
Oregon 60 0.2%
Nebraska 50 0.2%
Louisiana 40 0.2%
Iowa 30 0.1%
South Dakota 30 0.1%
Indiana no estimate
Kentucky
Maine
Montana no data
Nevada
North Dakota
Vermont
West Virginia

The following table compares the employment of Computer and Information Research Scientists to employment in all occupations. Five states have more than 40 jobs for Computer and Information Research Scientists per 100,000 employees: Virginia, Maryland, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and the District of Columbia.

State 15-1111, Computer and Information Research Scientists All employment 15-1111 per 100,000 employment
Virginia 3,360 3,527,350 95.3
Maryland 2,100 2,462,470 85.3
Rhode Island 360 448,150 80.3
Massachusetts 1,480 3,119,100 47.4
District of Columbia 280 639,390 43.8
Washington 960 2,693,220 35.6
California 4,440 14,001,730 31.7
Alabama 560 1,807,480 31.0
New Jersey 1,010 3,770,550 26.8
Mississippi 270 1,070,820 25.2
New Mexico 190 777,560 24.4
Utah 270 1,148,520 23.5
Delaware 80 397,730 20.1
Georgia 670 3,744,740 17.9
Pennsylvania 950 5,483,220 17.3
Colorado 360 2,157,690 16.7
Texas 1,660 10,089,870 16.5
Idaho 90 594,750 15.1
Connecticut 240 1,598,640 15.0
Ohio 720 4,921,690 14.6
Illinois 790 5,528,420 14.3
Hawaii 80 571,630 14.0
South Carolina 210 1,746,820 12.0
Arizona 280 2,367,120 11.8
Florida 730 7,103,950 10.3
Oklahoma 150 1,483,760 10.1
New York 840 8,344,020 10.1
New Hampshire 60 603,420 9.9
Tennessee 220 2,569,420 8.6
South Dakota 30 387,590 7.7
North Carolina 290 3,772,780 7.7
Minnesota 170 2,562,450 6.6
Nebraska 50 901,690 5.5
Kansas 70 1,304,780 5.4
Arkansas 60 1,135,560 5.3
Michigan 170 3,755,890 4.5
Missouri 100 2,588,450 3.9
Wisconsin 100 2,608,740 3.8
Oregon 60 1,569,700 3.8
Louisiana 40 1,832,830 2.2
Iowa 30 1,438,510 2.1
Alaska 308,050 0.0
Indiana ** 2,724,850
Kentucky 1,716,060 0.0
Maine 577,410 0.0
Montana 424,300 0.0
Nevada 1,113,530 0.0
North Dakota 355,710 0.0
Vermont 286,990 0.0
West Virginia 688,170 0.0
Wyoming 269,910 0.0
Guam 59,560 0.0
Puerto Rico 950,570 0.0
Virgin Islands 42,700 0.0

I was curious has to how employment in this sector was correlated with state unemployment rates. This is the comparison for May-June 2010. The short answer is that the two series are not correlated. The R^2 for an OLS regression is just .01.


This is a BLS map of the location quotient[*] for occupation code 15-1111.

(*) The location quotient is the ratio of the area concentration of occupational employment to the national average concentration. A location quotient greater than one indicates the occupation has a higher share of employment than average, and a location quotient less than one indicates the occupation is less prevalent in the area than average.

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